Hiroine Protagonist /Antagonist

Cultural Appropriation Cracker.: White People and Dreadlocks →

rastagaljamaican:

fearfullymade-locs:

flower-nonetheless:

redwoodhummingbird:

airinmylungs:

I understand the idea of “cultural appropriation.” I really do. I understand the idea of minority versus majority, oppressed versus oppressor. Yet, I still think that it’s…

(Source: )

— 11 months ago with 570 notes
Red Light Politics: H is for hubris, Hugo; S is for sordid, Schwyzer →

redlightpolitics:

I have stopped blogging, haven’t I? It wasn’t planned and it certainly doesn’t feel definite. Yet, I have a grand total of 5,678 unanswered emails. No hyperbole, this is the figure accumulated in all 4 of my mailboxes that I stopped checking a couple of months ago. In the past week I’ve gotten…

— 11 months ago with 974 notes

yoisthisracist:

anonymous asked: Ever notice how no radio stations say, “All the hits without the Country!”? It’s almost like they don’t go out of their way to alienate white listeners.

Yeah, how surprising.

— 1 year ago with 110 notes

What do you do when thinspo accounts start following you? I stopped reading or paying attention to any fashion magazine when I was around 16 or 17. I accept that others may read them for different reasons - I always felt so bad about myself after I was glad to cut them out. I barely use this tumblr - are these bot accounts, like on twitter? 

— 1 year ago with 1 note
"

I tried to register to vote three times when I was in college. Each time I failed to pass the “literacy” test. Only after the passage of the Voting Rights Act was I registered, and thank God Almighty, my parents voted as well. They were not activists but ordinary folks who wanted the same rights as the white people. Today, I feel the scabs coming off the old wounds and they are bleeding again. I knew people who were asked how many bubbles are in a bar of soap, or how many grains of sand are in a quart jar as part of their literacy test. I remember that the names of those who attempted to register were run in the local newspapers so that, by law, any registered (read white) voter could challenge their moral fitness to become voters. The real reason was to publicize who they were so their employers and Ku Klux Klan neighbors could take actions against them for having the nerve to think they should have the rights reserved for whites.

So much of our focus is on what the law did to help to emancipate generations of African Americans. However, the deep scars are still there in the form of emotional trauma (some friends of mine suffer from post-traumatic stress syndrome), loss of family to death, broken dreams, ruined lives, and consigned once again to second and third class citizenship.

This is why I mourn today because the conditions for so many have not changed that much. Moreover, the gains we won continue to erode as we see in the dismantling of the most important piece of legislation on racial equality of my lifetime.

"

Civil Rights Heroes (Workers and Volunteers) on Face Book

#CivilRightsVeteran #SNCC Member Joyce Ladner addressed the #SupremeCourt’s #VotingRights decision.

(via corinnestark)

— 1 year ago with 7128 notes
mirrortheories:

fuck literally everything about what just happened. 

mirrortheories:

fuck literally everything about what just happened. 

(Source: littleopticalmachine)

— 1 year ago with 253 notes
âpihtawikosisân: I'm not apologising for something I didn't do! →

apihtawikosisan:

1) So you say you didn’t steal our land. Okay. Well first off….

ARE YOU SURE?

Did you buy a piece of land, or do you live on a piece of land in an area where there is not even a Treaty in place supposedly ceding land? Like pretty much all of British Columbia, vast areas in the North, and most…

— 1 year ago with 238 notes

awkwardsituationist:

cambridge university students were asked on campus why they needed feminism. here are 60 answers. click the link for over 600 more.

— 1 year ago with 435230 notes
The DIY Couturier: 21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You're Depressed. →

rosalindrobertson:

A while ago, I penned a fairly angry response to something circulating on the internet – the 21 Habits of Happy People. It pissed me off beyond belief, that there was an inference that if you weren’t Happy, you simply weren’t doing the right things.

I’ve had depression for as long as I can…

— 1 year ago with 27372 notes
How to Keep Moving Forward Even When Your Brain Hates You →

curiousgeorgiana:

caylakluver:

Oh my GOD. This is so important. “My brain hates me,” is literally one of my refrains, and I have EVERY SINGLE PROBLEM in this article, depression-related and not. Read it, for the love (or hatred) of grapefruit juice. Read. It.

(via YA Highway)

I really liked this article—especially for the discussion of how beneficial a “ritual” can be on bad brain days (though I know that doesn’t work for everyone). 

And I really liked this: 

Stop telling yourself that whatever you are struggling with “should” be easy…

And really, just stop saying “should” to yourself about your thoughts and feelings in any context. You feel how you feel. The things in your head are the things in your head. You can’t change either directly through sheer force of will. You can only change what you do.
— 1 year ago with 1734 notes

writeswrongs:

Hi, just your local Mayan here reminding you the world isn’t ending tomorrow.  

Also, that Mayans still exist.

And finally, that we have a language that is still spoken, and written, and that our science and other studies have developed with time and we’re not some stone age group of savages carving shit into rocks for all eternity just so some iztacchuatl will find it and tell us white jesus is gonna end the world when our calender stops working for her.

gringos impitzoyos.

— 1 year ago with 24380 notes
No, Actually, You’re YOUR SON’S Mother

sadybusiness:

I spent most of yesterday viscerally angry at Liza Long. So angry that I was just on the verge of incoherence. And I’m trying, now that I’m more collected, to figure out why. I believe that women should have the ability to talk about their lives, especially the harsh or scary portions of their lives. I believe that women should be able to talk about their bad decisions. I don’t believe in holding anyone to an unrealistic standard of motherhood or womanhood. And yet, of everything I’ve read, this is the one thing by a woman that’s sent me into full judgmental Internet “WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH YOU” mode. The one blog post that just crossed the line from “memoir” to “abuse.” 

So, let’s start here, because this needs to be said again: We don’t have any solid data on any mental health issues faced by Adam Lanza. We don’t! Someone said that he might have been on the autism spectrum, but to my knowledge, we don’t even know that for sure. And since autism doesn’t have any intrinsic connection to violence, anyway, that seems irrelevant. 

What we do have is a woman who believes that her own son’s behavior — which has not yet been diagnosed — is connected to an organic disorder, and is willing to publicly compare him to mass murderers, online. And for a few days, anyone who had a problem with her story, or wanted to look more closely at its context, was virulently shamed. 

And it turns out, that context is important. In fact, it’s fucking crucial. Now, we know there was a messy divorce, that Liza believes her ex-husband is violent enough to try to kill her, and that this ex-husband (before abandoning and deciding not to engage with his kids any more because of his “new family”) incarcerated “Michael” four times, once for “not doing his chores,” and is complaining about the fact that the kids are accusing him of abuse. We know the “crazy” behavior started around the time the divorce did. And we know that the threat of incarceration or abandonment is used by Liza Long as well, to control her children. Suddenly, “Michael” has gone from an alien monster with incomprehensible violent urges to a severely abused 13-year-old boy who just lost a parent. And suddenly, all of that scary evil devil-eyed anger in him, while still scary, and still destructive, seems to have come from something recognizably human.  

Read More

— 1 year ago with 180 notes
"“We deeply regret the necessity of today’s decision, but we do not have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike,” Chief Executive Gregory Rayburn said in a statement. “Hostess Brands will move promptly to lay off most of its 18,500-member workforce and focus on selling its assets to the highest bidders,” Rayburn added. Union President Frank Hurt said on Thursday that the crisis at the company was the “result of nearly a decade of financial and operational mismanagement” and that management was trying to make union workers the scapegoats for a plan by Wall Street investors to sell Hostess."

Twinkies Maker Hostess Plans to Go Out of Business - NYTimes.com

The closing of Hostess is union-busting, pure and simple. The company is already bankrupt (and never believe a company that tells you that it is bankrupt because it paid its workers too well), and its workers weren’t going to accept more race-to-the-bottom cuts. 

I wish I had time to dig into this more thoroughly, but for now, as someone said to me on Twitter, they’re going to sell off their assets, fire all those workers, and destroy another iconic American brand in pursuit of the bottom line. 

Imagine the good press if Hostess said “We want to stay open, and we want to pay American workers good wages and benefits, and we are struggling right now but we want to keep this brand alive.” 

Instead, they’ll go the way of so many other companies that have used bankruptcy to get out of taking care of the workers that made them run.

And don’t worry, folks, you’ll still get your Twinkies: someone will no doubt buy the rights to the name and the recipe for everlasting phallic snack cakes. It’s just that you won’t know they were made by well-paid union workers anymore. 

Not that most of you ever cared. 

(via differentclasswar)

(via differentclasswar)

— 1 year ago with 542 notes
HOW TO SHARPEN PENCILS: The People's Bailout →

howtosharpenpencils:

This is a long post but it’s about something pretty interesting so I hope you’ll indulge …

Like many folks, Occupy Wall Street has been some doing good work in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, helping people on the ground.

Now OWS is launching the ROLLING JUBILEE, a program that has been in…

— 1 year ago with 2781 notes